Rage. Probably political rage. Maybe just personal rage. Lots of sarcasm and cynicism. Also pretty pictures.

How about increase the teachers’ salaries (which is in this budget) but don’t cut the 3000 filled positions/jobs (600+ are vacant positions for 180+ days) and forget about the corporate tax cuts that are already being enjoyed? How do we need more corporate tax cuts in this state? We’re already the most Business/Corporate-friendly state in the US. How is eliminating State Jobs good for job creation - i mean, i know public employees are the devil and all, but they are still employed! This is ridiculous. I cannot wait until we can vote you out of office.

PerSe1010:

jasencomstock:
Supposedly this is a compelling cartoon that shows how ‘crazy’ those public sector unions are.

So what, because some people working in the Private Sector (where, in my line of work, the pay is much higher than in the Public Sector) supposedly don’t have pensions or benefits, the people working in the Public Sector suddenly don’t deserve the benefits that they’ve worked for? Bullshit. How about corporations that are making record profits put some of that money back into their workforce and stop making decent hard-working public sector employees into the bad guy? Unions happened for a reason - workers were and once again are being mistreated and taken advantage of and in this recession where so many people are jobless, they are a dime-a-dozen. Are we seriously going to have to repeat the entire 20th century? (and not just Labor issues…)

PerSe1010:

jasencomstock:

Supposedly this is a compelling cartoon that shows how ‘crazy’ those public sector unions are.

So what, because some people working in the Private Sector (where, in my line of work, the pay is much higher than in the Public Sector) supposedly don’t have pensions or benefits, the people working in the Public Sector suddenly don’t deserve the benefits that they’ve worked for? Bullshit. How about corporations that are making record profits put some of that money back into their workforce and stop making decent hard-working public sector employees into the bad guy? Unions happened for a reason - workers were and once again are being mistreated and taken advantage of and in this recession where so many people are jobless, they are a dime-a-dozen. Are we seriously going to have to repeat the entire 20th century? (and not just Labor issues…)

It’s also laughable how very few people realize how beneficial recessions are for companies. We know for a fact that after a small loss, they always rebound to higher profits, record profits in many cases.

But it gives the company reasons to lay people off regularly, justifies taking things like health care benefits and retirement pensions, vacation days, sick days, etc.

Which, of course, in turn creates a work force that does 3 times as much work for half of the pay they deserve. Pay raise freezes, budget cuts, etc. Corporations don’t WANT the recession to be over. The work force has more options, they have to pay more for talented, hard working employees, they have to spend more in operating costs.

It’s funny that so few point out the truth about recessions in America and how much the corporations embrace them and use them to increase the bottom line and to cut its work force while the remaining employees generally have to take up the slack of those missing workers and do the job of 2 or 3 people.

THAT is what happens. It’s not, ‘Oh, Verizon just decided one day that they no longer need 1,7000 employees.’ This is opportunity for higher profits, folks. It’s depressing that so few people seem to get the very basics of corporation operations, opportunity and the recession.

Layoffs like these scare the remaining employees who are more than willing to take on the additional duties if it means they get to keep their job. So you work twice as hard, still make the same miserable pay and the company skips off into the sunset with (again) record profits for the quarter.

reddit user gloomdoom

Brittany and I were just talking about this one the phone earlier. You know how to keep labor cheap, how to get away with not paying your workers shit and cutting their benefits?

Keep them scared, make sure there aren’t many other options out there.

And hell, while we’re at it, diminish the power of unions and the workers and trick them into voting for politicians that make laws that make the above shit easier to pull off.

(via abaldwin360)

I read some of the other comments that gloomdoom has made, and a number of them are quite beyond cynical and I didn’t agree with all of them, however, a good point is made here. We keep seeing this over and over again with large corporations that are making high to record profits these past months, couple years - bonuses to the CEOs and top execs concurrent with extreme job cuts into the thousands. Rather than increasing the wages of the employees or offering better benefits, they are cutting them loose and increasing the workload of the remaining employees. The corporations lobby against unionization so they can’t speak out for themselves and be safely heard and responded to. The Republicans and even some Democrats pass the legislation that allows for this to happen. The corporations contribute to the campaigns to make sure the legislators do what they want. The talking heads and pundits, who are in other media corporations’ pockets, spin it to make it look like it’s the American way and we should be proud that we live in a country where something like this is possible. “Yes, even you could one day become the CEO of Verizon and make millions in a single quarterly bonus! You don’t want that to not be possible, do you? This could be you!” The economy as a whole divides itself more and more and there’s little to stop it. It becomes political. It becomes personal. It’s a cynical view, but how far off from the truth is it?  (via PerSe1010)

robertreich:

The Cory Booker imbroglio has ignited a silly but potentially pernicious debate in the Democratic Party between so-called “pro-growth centrists” who want the President to focus on how well he’s done getting the economy back on its feet after the Bush administration almost knocked it out, and…

simplyopinions:

mohandasgandhi:

think-progress:

Where the job creation REALLY is: Obama’s clean energy initiatives create 68,000 jobs to Keystone XL’s 6,000 temporary jobs. 

No, drill for oil, destroy the environment, and make us “energy independent!”

Fuck yeah, Obama!

simplyopinions:

mohandasgandhi:

think-progress:

Where the job creation REALLY is: Obama’s clean energy initiatives create 68,000 jobs to Keystone XL’s 6,000 temporary jobs. 

No, drill for oil, destroy the environment, and make us “energy independent!”

Fuck yeah, Obama!

dcdecoder:

Mitt Romney never has coughed up his tax returns. But today, he told an audience in South Carolina he pays “closer to the 15 percent rate than anything.”

“What’s the effective rate I’ve been paying? It’s probably closer to the 15 percent rate than anything,” Romney said. “Because my last…

abaldwin360:

standalone-sysadmin.com

A bill is currently making its way through the United States Senate that effectively eliminates overtime pay for IT professionals. The important text of the bill is:

Section 13(a)(17) of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 213(a)(17)) is amended to…

Get a job, you hippie!

Get a job, you hippie!

What You’ll Pay in Taxes if American Jobs Act ISN’T Passed By Congress - Tax Calculator

Good morning,

I’ll cut to the chase: If Congress doesn’t act soon, middle-class Americans will see their taxes go up starting on January 1st, taking almost $1,000 out of the pockets of a typical family next year. 

Last year, President Obama and members of both parties in Congress cut the payroll tax for 155 million workers, putting money in your pockets.  Now, that tax cut is expiring. So in September, the President and I proposed extending that tax cut and cutting your taxes even further: giving the typical family a $1,500 tax cut.  Steps like this won’t just help families feel more secure in their budgets, it’ll give them more money to spend at local businesses that will hire more people and make investments in new equipment too.

We thought the extension would win bipartisan support again. How could Republicans in Congress, some of whom have pledged not to raise taxes by a penny, oppose extending the same tax cuts they just passed? But after years of protecting expensive tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans, many Republicans now say we should let this middle-class tax cut expire.

There’s a lot at stake here for you and your family, and the better folks understand how much more they may have to pay, the easier it will be to get Congress to do the right thing. We’ve put together a calculator to show how much of your money hangs in the balance.

Try it out.

Check out the calculator and share it with other tax payers.

Last week, we finally got some good news from Capitol Hill. Congress passed another measure from our American Jobs Act, creating tax credits for companies that hire veterans – and yesterday President Obama signed the bill into law. 

But folks, as important as that is, it’s not nearly enough.

There is not a single good reason – not one – why Congress should stop there. Just like that tax credit will help ensure returning service members can find a job, the American Jobs Act helps put Americans back to work by jump starting the private sector and creating an economy that’s built to last. Congress ought to pass the rest of our proposals, too.

And Congress should start with protecting your paycheck.

Let me lay out the facts: Today, because of our tax cuts, everyone who collects a paycheck contributes 4.2 percent of their wages in payroll taxes. But if Congress doesn’t act, that tax will go up two percentage points, to 6.2 percent. That might not sound like much, but to an average family, that’s a difference of almost $1,000 a year.

President Obama and I have proposed cutting the rate even further – down to 3.1 percent. That would give a tax cut to 160 million workers next year, providing a $1,500 cut to the typical middle class family. 

We have 40 days for Congress to take action. That’s 40 days for Republicans in Congress to do the right thing for the country – or 40 days before they force middle-class families to pay almost $1,000 more.

Take a minute to calculate what’s at stake for you: 

http://www.whitehouse.gov/economy/jobsact/calculator

Sincerely, 

Vice President Joe Biden 

occupyonline:

1. It names the source of the crisis.
Political insiders have avoided this simple reality: The problems of the 99% are caused in large part by Wall Street greed, perverse financial incentives, and a corporate takeover of the political system. Now that this is understood, the genie is out of the bottle and it can’t be put back in.

2. It provides a clear vision of the world we want.
We can create a world that works for everyone, not just the wealthiest 1%. And we, the 99%, are using the spaces opened up by the Occupy movement to conduct a dialogue about the world we want.

3. It sets a new standard for public debate.
Those advocating policies and proposals must now demonstrate that their ideas will benefit the 99%. Serving only the 1% will not suffice, nor will claims that the subsidies and policies that benefit the 1% will eventually “trickle down.”

4. It presents a new narrative.
The solution is not to starve government or impose harsh austerity measures that further harm middle-class and poor people already reeling from a bad economy. Instead, the solution is to free society and government from corporate dominance. A functioning democracy is our best shot at addressing critical social, environmental, and economic crises.

5. It creates a big tent.
We, the 99%, are people of all ages, races, occupations, and political beliefs. We will resist being divided or marginalized. We are learning to work together with respect.

6. It offers everyone a chance to create change.
No one is in charge; no organization or political party calls the shots. Anyone can get involved, offer proposals, support the occupations, and build the movement. Because leadership is everywhere and new supporters keep turning up, there is a flowering of creativity and a resilience that makes the movement nearly impossible to shut down.

7. It is a movement, not a list of demands.
The call for deep change—not temporary fixes and single-issue reforms—is the movement’s sustaining power. The movement is sometimes criticized for failing to issue a list of demands, but doing so could keep it tied to status quo power relationships and policy options. The occupiers and their supporters will not be boxed in.

8. It combines the local and the global.
People in cities and towns around the world are setting their own local agendas, tactics, and aims. What they share in common is a critique of corporate power and an identification with the 99%, creating an extraordinary wave of global solidarity.

9. It offers an ethic and practice of deep democracy and community.
Slow, patient decision-making in which every voice is heard translates into wisdom, common commitment, and power. Occupy sites are set up as communities in which anyone can discuss grievances, hopes, and dreams, and where all can experiment with living in a space built around mutual support.

10. We have reclaimed our power.
Instead of looking to politicians and leaders to bring about change, we can see now that the power rests with us. Instead of being victims to the forces upending our lives, we are claiming our sovereign right to remake the world.

(Source: citizen-earth)

motherjones:

Chart of the Day! The Kauffman Foundation asked economics bloggers to describe the US economy in one word. Most of those words are synonyms for “bad.” They found some other interesting stuff, too.

PerSe1010: I love these charts. 

motherjones:

Chart of the Day! The Kauffman Foundation asked economics bloggers to describe the US economy in one word. Most of those words are synonyms for “bad.” They found some other interesting stuff, too.

PerSe1010: I love these charts. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

motherjones:

All that stuff you’ve been hearing about college grads falling behind, and student loans killing the middle class? Yeah, that shit’s for real.

MoJo in making this post was making a point about college grads in general, but I want to take the point to highlight the gender disparity between these charts. It looks, at first glance, like male college grads and female college grads earn the same and have lost the same. However, I’ll point you to the all-important Y-axis of this chart, for the males’ chart the range is 55k to 75k. For the females’ it is 42k to 58k. Women’s highest average earnings during the 99-2010 period were 56k, and men’s lowest were 59k. Fun with charts, y’all.

thepoliticalnotebook:

motherjones:

All that stuff you’ve been hearing about college grads falling behind, and student loans killing the middle class? Yeah, that shit’s for real.

MoJo in making this post was making a point about college grads in general, but I want to take the point to highlight the gender disparity between these charts. It looks, at first glance, like male college grads and female college grads earn the same and have lost the same. However, I’ll point you to the all-important Y-axis of this chart, for the males’ chart the range is 55k to 75k. For the females’ it is 42k to 58k. Women’s highest average earnings during the 99-2010 period were 56k, and men’s lowest were 59k. Fun with charts, y’all.

abaldwin360:

Holy SHIT this is so true!!!
[SOURCE]

abaldwin360:

Holy SHIT this is so true!!!

[SOURCE]