Rage. Probably political rage. Maybe just personal rage. Lots of sarcasm and cynicism. Also pretty pictures.

It was no different than any other wedding I’ve attended when you have two people who are in love with each other.

—Texas Rep. Al Green • On going to the wedding of Rep. Barney Frank and his longtime partner, James Ready, on Saturday. Current Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick officiated the ceremony, noting (jokingly) that the couple vowed to love one another through Republican and Democratic administrations alike. Though Frank is usually very media-friendly, the soon-to-retire congressman kept his wedding private. “We’re not doing any media today,” he told Reuters. Good for them! (via shortformblog)

sweetupndown:

you thought I didn’t really notice. But I did. I wanted to high-five you. Yesterday I had a pair of brothers in my store. One was maybe between 15-17. He was a wrestler at the local high school. Kind of tall, stocky and handsome. He had a younger brother, who was maybe about…

PerSe1010: Awesome brother.

(Source: kissing-whiskey)

thenewrepublic:

Fifteen years ago this month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The bill, which defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman under federal law, passed by a vote of 342-67—an outcome that roughly reflected public opinion at the time. But over the past decade and a half, our society has undergone a seismic shift in how it recognizes and accepts the relationships of gay and lesbian couples. This report provides a snapshot of this dramatic transformation and illustrates the crystallizing consensus in favor of legal relationship recognition for gay and lesbian couples, extending all the way to marriage in many parts of the country. In 1996, DOMA was thought to have ended the debate on marriage. But it seems to have been only the beginning of a more profound shift in favor of gay and lesbian couples.
Graphic via Queerty.

thenewrepublic:

Fifteen years ago this month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The bill, which defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman under federal law, passed by a vote of 342-67—an outcome that roughly reflected public opinion at the time. But over the past decade and a half, our society has undergone a seismic shift in how it recognizes and accepts the relationships of gay and lesbian couples. This report provides a snapshot of this dramatic transformation and illustrates the crystallizing consensus in favor of legal relationship recognition for gay and lesbian couples, extending all the way to marriage in many parts of the country. In 1996, DOMA was thought to have ended the debate on marriage. But it seems to have been only the beginning of a more profound shift in favor of gay and lesbian couples.

Graphic via Queerty.