Rage. Probably political rage. Maybe just personal rage. Lots of sarcasm and cynicism. Also pretty pictures.

hermannview:

occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)
The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 
As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”
Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.”
Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.
According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

“There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.
“That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.”

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.
Read More
SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

If SOPA and PIPA were stopped, then CISPA must be stopped. I support efforts to stop this monstrosity of legislation.

hermannview:

occupyallstreets:

CISPA Replaces SOPA As Internet’s Enemy No. 1 (Must Read)

The Internet has a new enemy. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 (CISPA), also known as H.R. 3523, is a “cybersecurity” bill in the House of Representatives. While CISPA does not focus primarily on intellectual property (though that’s in there, too), critics say the problems with the bill run just as deep. 

As with SOPA and PIPA, the first main concern about CISPA is its “broad language,” which critics fear allows the legislation to be interpreted in ways that could infringe on our civil liberties. The Center for Democracy and Technology sums up the problems with CISPA this way:

    •    The bill has a very broad, almost unlimited definition of the information that can be shared with government agencies notwithstanding privacy and other laws;
    •    The bill is likely to lead to expansion of the government’s role in the monitoring of private communications as a result of this sharing;
    •    It is likely to shift control of government cybersecurity efforts from civilian agencies to the military;
    •    Once the information is shared with the government, it wouldn’t have to be used for cybesecurity, but could instead be used for any purpose that is not specifically prohibited.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) adds that CISPA’s definition of “cybersecurity” is so broad that “it leaves the door open to censor any speech that a company believes would ‘degrade the network.’”

Moreover, the inclusion of “intellectual property” means that companies and the government would have “new powers to monitor and censor communications for copyright infringement.

Furthermore, critics warn that CISPA gives private companies the ability to collect and share information about their customers or users with immunity — meaning we cannot sue them for doing so, and they cannot be charged with any crimes.

According to the EFF, CISPA “effectively creates a ‘cybersecurity’ exemption to all existing laws.”

There are almost no restrictions on what can be collected and how it can be used, provided a company can claim it was motivated by ‘cybersecurity purposes.’” the EFF continues.

That means a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your emails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and modify those communications or prevent them from reaching their destination if it fits into their plan to stop cybersecurity threats.

Read the full text of CISPA here, or the full official summary at the bottom of this page.

Read More

SIGN THE PETITION TO SAVE THE INTERNET FROM CISPA

If SOPA and PIPA were stopped, then CISPA must be stopped. I support efforts to stop this monstrosity of legislation.

Think #PIPA & #SOPA are bad? Meet their big brother.

Just Say No to ACTA

Sign the Petition asking the #EU to #VoteNoOnACTA

youranonnews:

ACTA in a Nutshell –
What is ACTA?  ACTA is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. A new intellectual property enforcement treaty being negotiated by the United States, the European Community, Switzerland, and Japan, with Australia, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Mexico, Jordan, Morocco, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, and Canada recently announcing that they will join in as well.
Why should you care about ACTA? Initial reports indicate that the treaty will have a very broad scope and will involve new tools targeting “Internet distribution and information technology.”
What is the goal of ACTA? Reportedly the goal is to create new legal standards of intellectual property enforcement, as well as increased international cooperation, an example of which would be an increase in information sharing between signatory countries’ law enforcement agencies.
Essential ACTA Resources - 
Read more about ACTA here: ACTA Fact Sheet
Read the authentic version of the ACTA text as of 15 April 2011, as finalized by participating countries here: ACTA Finalized Text
Follow the history of the treaty’s formation here: ACTA history
Read letters from U.S. Senator Ron Wyden wherein he challenges the constitutionality of ACTA: Letter 1 | Letter 2 | Read the Administration’s Response to Wyden’s First Letter here: Response
Watch a short informative video on ACTA: ACTA Video
Watch a lulzy video on ACTA: Lulzy Video
Say NO to ACTA. It is essential to spread awareness and get the word out on ACTA.

youranonnews:

ACTA in a Nutshell –

What is ACTA?  ACTA is the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement. A new intellectual property enforcement treaty being negotiated by the United States, the European Community, Switzerland, and Japan, with Australia, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Mexico, Jordan, Morocco, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates, and Canada recently announcing that they will join in as well.

Why should you care about ACTA? Initial reports indicate that the treaty will have a very broad scope and will involve new tools targeting “Internet distribution and information technology.”

What is the goal of ACTA? Reportedly the goal is to create new legal standards of intellectual property enforcement, as well as increased international cooperation, an example of which would be an increase in information sharing between signatory countries’ law enforcement agencies.

Essential ACTA Resources

  • Read more about ACTA here: ACTA Fact Sheet
  • Read the authentic version of the ACTA text as of 15 April 2011, as finalized by participating countries here: ACTA Finalized Text
  • Follow the history of the treaty’s formation here: ACTA history
  • Read letters from U.S. Senator Ron Wyden wherein he challenges the constitutionality of ACTA: Letter 1 | Letter 2 | Read the Administration’s Response to Wyden’s First Letter here: Response
  • Watch a short informative video on ACTA: ACTA Video
  • Watch a lulzy video on ACTA: Lulzy Video

Say NO to ACTA. It is essential to spread awareness and get the word out on ACTA.

(Source: youranonnews)

According to lawyers… (SOPA) doesn’t shut down your website and remove it from the Internet. It just makes it so that people cannot, in any way, access the website. So it’s sort of like coming up with a plan to prevent teen pregnancy that includes filling penises with cement.

JON STEWART, The Daily Show (via inothernews)

goodreasonnews:

cognitivedissonance:

An anti-​gay, opposite-​sex married Indiana state lawmaker offered a young man he met through a Craigslist M4M section $80 to meet for a hookup at a local Marriott hotel, and when the young man tried to back out of the deal, exposed himself and tried to prevent him from leaving the hotel room, according to a report in the Indianapolis Star.

The six-​term, 64-​year old Catholic, Republican lawmaker, Rep. Phillip Hinkle, has voted against same-​sex marriage, and even voted to ban marriage equality via a constitutional amendment.

The Star recounts the entire event in great detail, from the time the young man, Kameryn Gibson, “who lists his age as 20 in the ad but says he is 18 years old,” is contacted by Hinkle, to Hinkle’s email address, to details of the email exchanges, and includes statements that Hinkle offered the young man and his sister — who came to rescue her brother once the deal went awry — $100, along with his Blackberry and iPad. Later, Hinkle’s wife reportedly offered the brother and sister $10,000 to keep quiet.

As one of my friends always says, “Shock. Gasp. Clutch the pearls.” The interesting wrinkle here is the wife offering $10,000 to the brother and sister to keep quiet - perhaps she knew of her husband’s dalliances? 

This is why Republican sex scandals are just so much more, well, scandalous. They seem to usually involve the family values crowd, who campaign on limiting rights for GLBTQ people and women, and then these politicians are invariably involved in extramarital relationships with the very people they wish to oppress. Do as I say, not as I screw. 

Here’s some free advice: If you can’t keep it in your pants, keep it off the internet. You will get caught otherwise. The internet is forever.

If there’s anything shocking about this it’s that people are still trying to hook up over craigslist.

soupsoup:

infoneer-pulse:

FiOS dominates as FCC measures actual Internet speeds
For the first time ever, the FCC has collected data (PDF) showing real-world speeds that Americans receive from their Internet providers. And the news is pretty good! Or, perhaps, it’s pretty bad!
Advocacy group Free Press blasted the results, released today. “No matter how industry tries to put a positive spin on these results, the report shows conclusively that many Americans are simply not getting what they pay for,” said research director S. Derek Turner in a statement. “This study indicates Comcast, Cox, and Verizon FiOS largely perform well, but other companies like Cablevision, AT&T, MediaCom, and Frontier all fail to deliver their customers the quality of service promised.
“In every other industry, giving your customers less than what they paid for is a very serious offense. ISPs should be held to the same standard, no matter how much they try to spin their way out of it.”
» via ars technica

Ouch, sorry Cablevision users. 

soupsoup:

infoneer-pulse:

FiOS dominates as FCC measures actual Internet speeds

For the first time ever, the FCC has collected data (PDF) showing real-world speeds that Americans receive from their Internet providers. And the news is pretty good! Or, perhaps, it’s pretty bad!

Advocacy group Free Press blasted the results, released today. “No matter how industry tries to put a positive spin on these results, the report shows conclusively that many Americans are simply not getting what they pay for,” said research director S. Derek Turner in a statement. “This study indicates Comcast, Cox, and Verizon FiOS largely perform well, but other companies like Cablevision, AT&T, MediaCom, and Frontier all fail to deliver their customers the quality of service promised.

“In every other industry, giving your customers less than what they paid for is a very serious offense. ISPs should be held to the same standard, no matter how much they try to spin their way out of it.”

» via ars technica

Ouch, sorry Cablevision users. 

The bill is ripe for abuse, as it allows rights-holders to require third-parties to block access to and take away revenues sources for online services, with limited oversight and due process.

In particular:

  1. By requiring “information location tools” — potentially encompassing any “director[ies], index[es], reference[s], pointer[s], or hypertext link[s]” — to remove access to entire domains, the bill puts burdens on countless Internet services.

  2. By requiring access to sites to be blocked by Domain Name System providers, it endangers the security and integrity of the Internet.

  3. The bill’s private right of action will no doubt be used by many rights-holders in ways that create significant burdens on legitimate online commerce services. The scope of orders and cost of litigation could be significant, even for companies acting in good faith.